Disneyland’s Dry Cleaning Gets an Energy Efficient Upgrade

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As the provider of laundry and dry cleaning services for Disneyland Resort’s costumes and hospitality supply items, L&N Costume and Linen Service knows a little something about both quantity and quality. Now, with the help of the Gas Technology Institute (GTI) and the Department of Energy, this forward-looking enterprise is embracing new, clean energy technologies as well.

L&N Costume and Linen Service has been laundering and dry cleaning Disneyland Resort’s costumes since 2000, when L&N’s president David Robbins approached Disneyland and proposed building a plant dedicated to their needs. Now, Robbins and his staff care for thousands of clothing and restaurant supply items for the Disneyland Resort every day.

Last October, L&N agreed to install a new technology called the Transport Membrane Condenser (TMC) at its commercial facility in Santa Ana, CA. The TMC innovation is a novel approach to recovering significant amounts of heat and water from waste streams through the use of a porous ceramic membrane that condenses water vapor and captures the waste heat.

According to David Robbins, L&N’s president, the TMC can recover 320,000 BTU per hour of heat and 50 gallons per hour of water. In three hours, enough energy is recovered from the TMC to heat 15 loads of water for L&N’s largest-capacity washing machine, and enough water is recovered to fill 1-1/2 loads of that same machine. The waste heat recovery made possible by the TMC preheats water so it is available without having to rely on steam from the boiler. This makes it possible for L&N to enjoy quicker daily start-ups of the production process in the morning and faster production times throughout the day.

Adding this technology to its system has enabled L&N to reduce fuel costs and curb its greenhouse gas emissions. Just several months into its demonstration of the TMC technology, L&N is already seeing significant results and enjoying impressive savings.

According to GTI project manager Dexin Wang, the TMC was installed on the top of L&N’s steam tunnel exhaust stack. Check out these before and after photos of the steam emissions on L&N’s roof:

Courtesy:

http://blog.energy.gov

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